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Top 20 Most Expensive Paintings
Written by Oksana   
Wednesday, 03 March 2010

This is a list of the highest known prices paid for paintings. The world's most famous paintings, especially old master works done before 1800, are generally owned by museums, which very rarely sell them, and as such, they are quite literally priceless.

 

20. Le Bassin aux Nymphéas by Claude Monet - $79.8 million

 

 

19. Turquoise Marilyn by Andy Warhol - $83.4 million

Painting

 

 

18. Yo, Picasso by Pablo Picasso - $83.8 million

Painting

 

 

17. Les Noces de Pierrette by Pablo Picasso - $84.9 million

Painting

 

 

16. A Wheatfield with Cypresses by Vincent van Gogh - $85.7 million

Painting

 

 

15. False Start by Jasper Johns - $85.9 million

Painting

 

 

14. Triptych, 1976 by Francis Bacon - $86.3 million

Painting

 

 

13. Massacre of the Innocents by Peter Paul Rubens - $92.3 million

Painting

 

 

12. Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer II by Gustav Klimt - $94.5 million

Painting

 

 

11. Portrait de l'artiste sans barbe by Vincent van Gogh - $94.5 million

Painting

 

 

10. Eight Elvises by Andy Warhol - $100.1 million

Painting

 

 

9. Irises by Vincent van Gogh - $101.2 million

Painting

 

 

8. Dora Maar au Chat by Pablo Picasso - $101.9 million

Painting

 

 

7. Portrait of Joseph Roulin by Vincent van Gogh - $100.9++ million

Painting

 

 

6. Garçon à la pipe by Pablo Picasso - $119 million

Painting

 

 

5. Bal du moulin de la Galette by Pierre-Auguste Renoir - $131 million

Painting

 

 

4. Portrait of Dr. Gachet by Vincent van Gogh - $138.4 million

Painting

 

 

3. Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I by Gustav Klimt - $144.2 million

Painting

 

 

2. Woman III by Willem de Kooning - $147.9 million

Painting

 

 

1. No. 5, 1948 by Jackson Pollock - $150.6 million

Painting

Source: List of the Most Expensive Paintings


Expressive Painting Style of Vincent van Gogh


Bright Impressionistic Paintings by Edouard Leon Cortes


Amazing Paintings by Antoine Blanchard


Magnificent Oil Paintings by Leonid Afremov. Part 1

 

 

Comments
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johnny   | | 2011-04-04 22:34:05
unbelievable.i only see such on line.wish i could see the paintings in real life
confused   | | 2011-07-11 02:59:51
...wow....
Compared to many of the others on this list... so many beautiful works... why ANYONE would pay $150.6 mill for THAT is beyond me.
42o     | | 2011-08-23 08:47:45
My thought exactly.
K2   | | 2012-01-13 23:16:35
I think its because of the history of Pollock more than just the work of Pollock. His work changed drastically from College. Actually inheriting some influence form his wife. If you research his wife you can find work that more resembles his action painting than his first works which were more representational. Anywho, at the time of Pollock America saw the opportunity to move to the top of the Art world, for the longest time Europe had reigned supreme. Well, Pollock was used in international business because his work was non representation, and along with critique commentary it proved also be thought provoking. This helped move america into the spotlight, giving them the chance to say to the rest of the world, "Look at our work! You still represent things? we have moved past petty problems like recreating images and into psychological issues with the artist and the medium!" Pollock is recorded as helping produce this movement of abstract work. So being part of the changing of times, and of course being dead his work has skyrocketed in price.
TylerDurden   | | 2011-07-11 06:39:33
Hahaha I understand the concept of modern art, but that paint mess is really the most expensive picture in the world, thats a shame really....
Guy   | | 2011-07-12 02:17:11
All of these paintings are horrible. Why anyone would pay anything for them is very strange.
Haley   | | 2011-07-12 22:09:58
It does seem like just a big mess of splattered paint that anyone can do, but its more than that and Jackson Pollock played a huge role in Abstact Expressionism back in the day. He ispired many artists of today. Although I would really like to see a Max Ernst painting up there :)
Dude   | | 2011-07-13 12:21:12
Yea, this is all pretty bad... I think I only liked 3 of them, and wouldn't pay much for them in any case
Anonymous   | | 2011-07-13 21:17:24
Holy shit!! These are fucking horrible!! I could out do any of these... The only decent one is massacre of the innocents. and don't get me started with that Jackson Pollock bullshit, I could take a shit on a canvas and it would look better than that!!
Hasu   | | 2011-07-14 18:03:06
The painting by Pollock was considered bold and a completely new style at the time. It made him really famous for inventing it and he has influenced many other artists as well. I don't find all of these paintings pleasing to my eye, but I definitely could not do anything close to these.
Boris   | | 2011-07-15 16:54:07
seriously?!? who the fuck is so stupid to buy those crap "paintings" of andy warhol, what a crap, not a bit of art just crappy old obsolete computer painting, i dont how he can be considered an artist just an autistic fool.
nina - what??     | | 2011-07-24 19:45:05
[color=purple]these are the best it doesnt matter if they look like scribbles because every
peice of it is art[/color]
IfOnly   | | 2011-07-22 22:35:54
I wish I had the money to buy one of these and hang it in my mansion where no one could see it.
Emily   | | 2011-07-23 03:50:40
It's sad to see the people who are so close minded to the work on here.
These paintings are impressing based on the scale and raw emotions behind them. Some times you have to see an abstract expressionist's work up close and personal to see the beauty.
Pollock was an alcoholic, misogynistic, mad man. He was a man trapped in his own vices and his work reflects his turmoil and passion. I admire him greatly. And when you stand in front of one his works (which are mostly very very large) you can see every stroke and gesture and feel his actions. He painted with his whole body. With every emotion he was feeling.
Pam   | | 2011-07-24 05:27:33
The Renoir and the Monet are breathtaking. The van Gogh I'm iffy about. The rest are crap.
Mike   | | 2011-07-25 11:11:17
to all the People who said they got inspired by Jackson Pollocks Painting
"YOU'RE ALL FULL OF SHIT"

"Painting with emotion" seriously Emily!!!?? the guy is obviously messed up in the head. he's just a drunk bastard with a brush.
Beth   | | 2011-07-25 21:47:57
Apparently no one here knows anything about art history OR art criticism.
Mike   | | 2011-07-27 05:06:35
that's another BS. you don't need to have an extensive knowledge in art history to appreciate art.

it's a big conspiracy, if critics say it's a masterpeace even though it looks like crap then everyone accepts it.well, everyone but those who have common sense.
Crystal   | | 2011-07-29 21:07:52
I love Monet. Impressionism are is truly my favorite style. Le Bassin aux Nymphéas isn't my favorite, but it is still amazingly beautiful. Almost all of Monet and the style he helped bring to life, make me feel at peace.

Van Gogh is another amazing artist. He's got such a unique style. You can tell his art just by looking at it and not even reading the title.

Picasso I have never been much of a fan of, but that's personal taste. I totally get why he's huge in the art world as well as the unique style to his art. He's really inspiring.

Pollock on the other hand... I possibly could see his art in an art museum or as an example for students to understand the importance of emotions and ingenuity to create new styles... but come on. 150.6 million for THAT piece. Someone must have been a Pollock fan or loves throwing money down the tubes. I'm not really an Andy Warhol fan either. I think some art is just like some clothes. You can get the same thing from a discount store for a fraction of the price, but people like to buy the tag just to brag about it.
K2   | | 2012-01-20 18:23:25
I think its because of the history of Pollock more than just the work of Pollock. His work changed drastically from College. Actually inheriting some influence form his wife. If you research his wife you can find work that more resembles his action painting than his first works which were more representational. Anywho, at the time of Pollock America saw the opportunity to move to the top of the Art world, for the longest time Europe had reigned supreme. Well, Pollock was used in international business because his work was non representation, and along with critique commentary it proved also be thought provoking. This helped move america into the spotlight, giving them the chance to say to the rest of the world, "Look at our work! You still represent things? we have moved past petty problems like recreating images and into psychological issues with the artist and the medium!" Pollock is recorded as helping produce this movement of abstract work. So being part of the changing of times, and of course being dead his work has skyrocketed in price.

And what you just said about Warhol was alot of his point in his work. Recreating pieces in a setting he called "The Factory" and then selling them back to the public with his name on it. The critics made him as big as he is because of the way they interpreted this as a comment on the Mass Produced and the Hand Made. (Hand Made But Mass Produced because his factory workers are pumping out the same thing in mass quantities.)
Henry Fenton     | | 2011-08-01 05:41:40
Of all these, I like
me   | | 2011-08-04 07:08:31
okay so not to be a dick but andy warhol made PRINTS not paintings... just sayingg
K2   | | 2012-01-20 23:12:46
He made paintings too.
erica nelson   | | 2011-11-18 00:47:26
U guys r crazy. These r some of the most beautiful, inspiring, and extremely important paintings and artists in modern time. What u fail to understand is that these paintings are inspired by previous artists and continue to inspire artists today.
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Copyright (C) 2007 Alain Georgette / Copyright (C) 2006 Frantisek Hliva. All rights reserved.

 
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